Thursday, November 25, 2010

On Being Thankful

On this day, my favorite of all holidays, I find myself being thankful for simple things: an extra quilt on the bed on a cold night; a long, leisurely shower and an over sized towel to wrap myself in; a morning call from my elderly friend to say, "I'm thankful you're close by now"; our new home, of course; for waking up this morning able to walk without falling; and remembering to turn the oven on and off at the appropriate times.

After today, who will remember, in the midst of their distractions and committments, to be thankful? Will they be thankful for a roof over their heads and heat and lights and food to eat? Will they be thankful for friends and family and a store close by? Will they be thankful for an income and a few bucks in their wallets? Will they be thankful for the medication they need or their doctor or pharmacy? Will they be thankful they are even alive?

Each year it seems we "celebrate" Thanksgiving and then leave it's message by the wayside. The day is barely half over and someone complainss the stuffing had too much sage, the pies were runny and the kids were rambunctious. Another comments on her sister-in-law's outfit and the weight she had gained.

We're such vain, judgmental, opinionated people. And all to keep up the empty, incessant chatter. Silence is a killer your know.

Try to steer the conversation toward humor, a new recipe, the volunteering you did earlier or God forbid, God himself, and you're treated like a leper.

Or, better yet, mention mention Sarah Palin and you've got everyone's attention. Like the young woman on Facebook who wished Palin would visit Grand Rapids. When asked why, she said, "Because she's going to be the best looking presidential candidate we've ever had and want to see her."

Talk about comments!

I had to remind myself that on Facebook, everyone seems to talk about anything to anyone. It's as though NOT saying something means you're alone or ignored, God forbid.

I for one, am thankful I've learned it's often best not to comment.

5 comments:

vlad said...

Perspective is formed by experience. In the winter of 1950 in Korea I was up to my butt in snow and 4,000,000 Chinamen were trying to kill me. Since
then everything has been ok. Those who never missed twelve or more consecutive meals, or felt the cold hand of stark terror clutch their tender parts do not appreciate life in America. I cannot assure them that they will always be safe and wellfed. If the ass falls out of our economy food trucks may stop running. Millions who refuse to work or fight may not receive their welfare check, to which they are told that they are entitled. They may riot, loot, rape and murder. Some would kill to feed their hungry children. Ask your wife what she would refuse to do to feed her kids. If you have not stored food and ammo you do not understand the situation.

WomanWhoRunsWithHorses said...

So true, Treesong. We need to carry the spirit of Thanksgiving with us through the coming year. I bet if we did, we would find we had a lot MORE to be grateful for at this time next year!

I have a FB account but only keep it so I can snatch photos of my grandsons. I don't care for the venue as a communication tool. Much too public for my taste.

I hope you and Sweetie enjoy the first Thanksgiving in your new home ...and enjoy many more in the years to come.

God bless!

: )

Mayberry said...

You're so right Tree. I'm thankful that my family got together at my folks' place, had a nice meal, got to enjoy the last day of warm weather for a while out on the front deck watching the birds, and the goats out in the pasture... It's not often we have four generations all in the same room.

HermitJim said...

Very good message, my friend! God Bless Our Republic!

Have a great day!

2 Tramps said...

We spent the holiday traveling over 1200 miles by car to care for elderly parents and try to inspire siblings that live near them to please help their parents. We were thankful that we had the freedom to make such a trip and that we still have elderly family that we can love.